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American horticultural society encyclopedia of perennials

American horticultural society encyclopedia of perennials



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American horticultural society encyclopedia of perennials

Bloemfontein peach (Flacourtia), Category: Grow Vibrant plants that have been named, not because of their popularity, but because of their “foreign appearance.” There are over 1,200 different species, many of which grow wild in South Africa. One of the most distinct, the Congo African tulip, is named for the Congo river, not for its color. Tulips were introduced from Holland in the 1600s. Bloemfontein peach was named after the capital of the Cape Colony, Bloemfontein, because it was discovered there. Today, it is an important ornamental plant, grown in both the United States and South Africa. Bloemfontein peach is easy to grow and has a long bloom time. A compact, reliable plant that does well in poor soil. It is reputed to be a cross of “Flacourtia burkei” and “Burkea coriacea.” Bloemfontein peach can be trained against a wall and grows to 12-24 inches tall, forming an upright round bush. It has an appearance somewhat resembling an orange pineapple. Bloemfontein peach is thought to bloom on both upper and lower branches during its bloom season. This warm-season plant blooms in late February through May in South Africa and blooms much later in the East, if at all.

Burkea was first discovered in 1827.

Other Bloemfontein peaches are: Light orange–flesh, large-fruited, Burkea, Bogga, Kestrel, Orange, Osten, Stanley, or “Orange Splendor.” Bloemfontein peach is a fine example of hardiness as it can be grown in USDA Hardiness Zones 4-9. See the Bloemfontein peach literature for more information.

Jan–Mar

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Category: Grow Vibrant plants that have been named, not because of their popularity, but because of their “foreign appearance.” There are over 1,200 different species, many of which grow wild in South Africa. One of the most distinct, the Congo African tulip, is named for the Congo river, not for its color. Tulips were introduced from Holland in the 1600s. Bloemfontein peach was named after the capital of the Cape Colony, Bloemfontein, because it was discovered there. Today, it is an important ornamental plant, grown in both the United States and South Africa. Bloemfontein peach is easy to grow and has a long bloom time. A compact, reliable plant that does well in poor soil. It is reputed to be a cross of “Flacourtia burkei” and “Burkea coriacea.” Bloemfontein peach can be trained against a wall and grows to 12-24 inches tall, forming an upright round bush. It has an appearance somewhat resembling an orange pineapple. Bloemfontein peach is thought to bloom on both upper and lower branches during its bloom season. This warm-season plant blooms in late February through May in South Africa and blooms much later in the East, if at all.

Burkea was first discovered in 1827.

Other Bloemfontein peaches are: Light orange–flesh, large-fruited, Burkea, Bogga, Kestrel, Orange, Osten, Stanley, or “Orange Splendor.” Bloemfontein peach is a fine example of hardiness as it can be grown in USDA Hardiness Zones 4-9. See the Bloemfontein peach literature for more information.

Jan–Mar

×

Category: Grow Vibrant plants that have been named, not because of their popularity, but because of their “foreign appearance.” There are over 1,200 different species, many of which grow wild in South Africa. One of the most distinct, the Congo African tulip, is named for the Congo river, not for its color. Tulips were introduced from Holland in the 1600s. Bloemfontein peach was named after the capital of the Cape Colony, Bloemfontein, because it was discovered there. Today, it is an important ornamental plant, grown in both the United States and South Africa. Bloemfontein peach is easy to grow and has a long bloom time. A compact, reliable plant that does well in poor soil. It is reputed to be a cross of “Flacourtia burkei” and “Burkea coriacea.” Bloemfontein peach can be trained against a wall and grows to 12-24 inches tall, forming an upright round bush. It has an appearance somewhat resembling an orange pineapple. Bloemfontein peach is thought to bloom on both upper and lower branches during its bloom season. This warm-season plant blooms in late February through May in South Africa and blooms much later in the East, if at all.

Burkea was first discovered in 1827.

Other Bloemfontein peaches are: Light orange–flesh, large-fruited, Burkea, Bogga, Kestrel, Orange, Osten, Stanley, or “Orange Splendor.” Bloemfontein peach is a fine example of hardiness as it can be grown in USDA Hardiness Zones 4-9. See the Bloemfontein peach literature for more information.

April–May

×

Category: Grow Vibrant plants that have been named, not because of their popularity, but because of their “foreign appearance.” There are over 1,200 different species, many of which grow wild in South Africa. One of the most distinct, the Congo African tulip, is named for the Congo river, not for its color


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