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Potted snake plant care

Potted snake plant care



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Potted snake plant care

I have a potted snake plant and I am having problems with it's leaves. They seem to be starting to turn brown and have spots. I have been watering it and the leaves stay pretty soft, but with time they seem to start turning brown and turning back toward normal. How do I know if the soil is too wet? I have a soil mix that has peat and vermiculite in it.

You might look into the nutrient level. Also, try not to overwater - the plant will water itself to stay in the right kind of balance. Is the potting soil brand that you use labeled as specifically for pots? You can often get a different kind of potting soil at your local garden center.

Quote: I have a potted snake plant and I am having problems with it's leaves. They seem to be starting to turn brown and have spots. I have been watering it and the leaves stay pretty soft, but with time they seem to start turning brown and turning back toward normal. How do I know if the soil is too wet? I have a soil mix that has peat and vermiculite in it.

If it's turning brown you need to water less or not at all and not leave it on its own. I'd suggest you take a sample of the soil from the top of the soil that is the closest to the top of the pot or that you can get. Place it into a plastic baggie and send it to a lab. With the lab results you will be able to get advice. If it's brown, that's one thing. If it looks blackened it's likely the soil has too much carbon.

If it looks normal, that might mean the plant is getting a bit too much water. But I don't know for sure if that's the case.

You might try increasing the light. This can be difficult with a potted snake plant, though. So that might be a good thing to try. I think a potted plant can usually tolerate being a bit more shaded. You can increase the amount of lighting. The lights can be placed near a window. So the amount of light is higher in that room but your plants are only in a smaller area.

Quote: I have a potted snake plant and I am having problems with it's leaves. They seem to be starting to turn brown and have spots. I have been watering it and the leaves stay pretty soft, but with time they seem to start turning brown and turning back toward normal. How do I know if the soil is too wet? I have a soil mix that has peat and vermiculite in it.

If it's turning brown you need to water less or not at all and not leave it on its own. I'd suggest you take a sample of the soil from the top of the soil that is the closest to the top of the pot and place it in a separate cup. If it's really bad you can add some vermiculite to help improve the texture of the soil so it doesn't feel so wet.

Quote: If it's getting too much water, do I let it drain?

I don't think draining is going to do anything because you're already having too much water. The soil is just going to be soggy. And you're having issues with that. You should try to leave your plant on its own more or at least move it out of direct sun for a day so you can inspect it and see if it's turning brown.

Quote:

Soil-Density:

It's not dense, it's not loose. It's just normal. The size of the container isn't a problem. The soil has plenty of air space. It's medium, not low-medium. I have a good root ball size with a well developed root system. It's not overgrown and overdeveloped either, it's just about average. I don't use water much, maybe once a month, usually more like once a week. And I don't water as much as my last soil.

I guess I don't know what you mean by 'not loose'. Loose soil is kind of like clay, it won't pack down, it'll be messy to work with. Loose soil will stay messy even when you try to compress it down. As long as you can grab it, it's ok. If you dig your pot out of the dirt and pull it off the shelf and it's still loose it's going to look wet and feel wiggly. Soil that is loose is going to stay loose, but if you squeeze it it will tighten up. So it is loose but it has spaces between the roots.

I do see where you are coming from about the water, I just feel like the more I use it the better. The potting soil itself isn't as absorbent as good potting mix (coconut husks), but I feel like it does better than peat or whatever I've been using. I'm a beginner, not a real potter so I don't know all the lingo!

I want to have as many holes as possible to keep the roots aerated. And since I started in small pots I have no problem having less than what's suggested.

And my containers will just have 3-4 holes for drainage. For drainage they're already pretty close together so I don't think I need any more than that.

Your containers are smaller so you probably don't have that many holes but it's not an issue.

Originally Posted by ljbrack

I use a similar setup to yours. Small pots, 1/4" holes and 4 for drainage, plenty of drainage, 2-4 per container. I have also put some drainage around the base of my containers and put some pea gravel in the bottom of the pots to keep moisture from sitting in and rotting the root ball. I use a little bit of mulch around my plants for the same reason. I find that the mulch keeps it nice and moist, not to wet but not so dry that it will burn out.

I use a similar setup to yours. Small pots, 1/4" holes and 4 for drainage, plenty of drainage, 2-4 per container. I have also put some drainage around the base of my containers and put some pea gravel in the bottom of the pots to keep moisture from sitting in and rotting the root ball. I use a little bit of mulch around my plants for the same reason. I find that the mulch keeps it nice and moist, not to wet but not so dry that it will burn out.

Sounds great. I'm going to try that in my garden this year.

Originally Posted by dkzgq

I am using two 12 gallon buckets for root balls right now. One was a little larger than the other. I put the smaller one in the garage with other buckets to keep it out of the wind. Put about 15 feet of hose between each one and turned off any water going into the other one.

I hope it works for you.

Originally Posted by ljbrack

I am using two 12 gallon buckets for root balls right now. One was a little larger than the other. I put the smaller one in the garage with other buckets to keep it out of the wind. Put about 15 feet of hose between each one and turned off any water going into the other one.

If I knew how to work a computer, I'd send you some pics. :)

Originally Posted by dkzgq

That's actually not a problem, since you can see


Watch the video: How to grow Snake plant faster, Propagate and Care Indoors.