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Landscaping around septic tank

Landscaping around septic tank



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Landscaping around septic tank

This is a discussion on Landscaping around septic tank within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category, -->,

Just curious. If I had a septic tank... I would never do anything around it that might block ...

Landscaping around septic tank

Just curious. If I had a septic tank... I would never do anything around it that might block the air or water flow. I figure my plants would be ok, but does anyone do anything more than that around them?

A:

Generally, yes, you should put your plants as close to the tank as possible and away from potential air draft. You also should put lights near the tank if you have room for that. The further away they are from the tank, the less light they will get, unless they are inside grow pots. There are a few exceptions to the rule.

I have a 100g tank. I have a 20" wide skimmer, and it takes up about 25% of my tank. I plant my live rock right next to the skimmer and some plants in it. I also have a pair of African blue catfish in a 10" deep sand substrate. These live right above the skimmer. They will happily poke their nose out of the water to see what is going on. I also have two small octopus in a 10" tank. I am lucky and have a lot of room for tanks. I have an old 120L aquarium that I can squeeze into, and the water flows through and out of it all the time. The octopus swims around in there, looks at the planted plants, and then goes back into the main tank. All this works great for me. I also have some small shrimp, two types of tetras, and a pleco. I love the peace and tranquility of my tank and don't want to do anything to mess it up. All of my tanks are planted, except the sand substrate in the 110L aquarium that I told you about before. If you have this, then don't plant anything. It won't work.

Re: Planted aquarium

Originally Posted by Dano

Thank you for replying to me. You might not see this now, but I found a tank, and I bought all the supplies I need. I got my fish today. I would love to have a catfish and maybe a guppy. I read through the tank and plant thread. I am a noob to aqua, but I think I have everything under control. I want to get a large tank with the skimmer and plants, and I will have an AC pump. The thing is, I don't want to get a 100g tank.

All of the plants are hardy in my climate zone, except the crypt, and the crypt is out of my climate zone.

I don't want to get a fish tank, but it looks like my options are between a tank or a small stand. I would love to have an AC pump, but I am on a fixed income, and I am worried about buying all the necessary equipment at once.

Do you think that is too much?

Re: Planted aquarium

I see your dilemma Dano. First time to use the new tank is going to be an ordeal for you. Second time is going to be even worse I am sure. My solution for a tank this size is get a 100 gallon aquarium and build a sump and filter system that will keep the water at a constant temp and volume. That way the aquarium is never a chore. The sump tank is a good place to experiment with plants. It's less hassle than building your own. I started that way and once I settled in I was a pro at keeping plants alive in a low tech tank. So you have my blessing to get started on the sump tank Dano.

Re: Planted aquarium

Hi. I just did something similar to this with a tank that had been sitting for a while. I removed all the plants and started a new garden bed in the tank. I placed rocks in the bottom so the plants couldn't be in the bio filtration, and also placed a few pieces of driftwood and a driftwood log into the tank. My plants started out slow, but a couple of them survived and now they are doing well and growing well. So it definitely works!

Re: Planted aquarium

Originally Posted by Dano

Hi. I just did something similar to this with a tank that had been sitting for a while. I removed all the plants and started a new garden bed in the tank. I placed rocks in the bottom so the plants couldn't be in the bio filtration, and also placed a few pieces of driftwood and a driftwood log into the tank. My plants started out slow, but a couple of them survived and now they are doing well and growing well. So it definitely works!

I don't think I would have thought about that, I was thinking about moving plants to the sump. But good to hear that it works. I had a lot of rocks in the old tank so a new bed is a welcome thing.

Re: Planted aquarium

That is great Dan, if it works for you then great!

I really think it's because I know that the roots are not in any direct water, so they don't see that I have a sump at all. I am hoping they will start growing on their own. I was going to get some plants from the store but instead of taking the time, I bought some rocks and planted them. So far they seem to be getting the hang of it.

Re: Planted aquarium

I know what you mean. I planted my tank in 2009 and was thinking that it was the only way to keep my plants alive for a long period of time. I think it works great. You can get the tank a few different ways, I took it apart and moved all the substrate to the new tank so that it could be built as I wanted it. Or you can get the tank and just plant your plants and rocks. I decided to go with the plants and rocks and make it into a planted aquarium and it has worked great for me. There is a guide at my website that shows how to plant the aquarium.

Re: Planted aquarium

That sounds good Dan. The one thing about your aquarium that I like is the fact that your substrate is all built into the sides of the tank. I have a 20 gallon tank and I wish it had been that way. I used to have to drill holes in the bottom and build it out and it took me


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