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Landscape design terminology

Landscape design terminology



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Government Architect NSW has created a glossary of key terms to allow for consistency of language in the communication of design across NSW. GANSW will continue to build upon this resource of terminology and definitions, creating a common language and shared terminology for design to help understand, review and provide advice in consistent terms. Home Resources Glossary. Language plays a key role in understanding different points of view. Different groups can use the same word to mean different concepts, or may be talking about the same thing but not realise this.

Content:
  • Landscape Terminology: What You Need to Know
  • Landscape Design
  • Lawn & Garden
  • 8 Basic Principles of Landscape Design
  • Navigation
  • Landscaping Terminology
  • 200 Essential Landscaping Vocabulary Words
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: Modern Landscape Garden Design Ideas

Landscape Terminology: What You Need to Know

Davis, Raymond J. Northwest Forest Plan—the first 20 years : status and trends of late-successional and old-growth forests. Portland, OR: U. Delcourt, H. Delcourt, and T. Webb III. Dynamic plant ecology: the spectrum of vegetation change in space and time. Quaternary Science Reviews. Elia, M. Reilly, G. Sanesi, T. Spies, and R. In Prep. Cumulative effects of contemporary wildfires on forest dynamics in the Eastern Cascade Mountains of Oregon, Washington, and California.

Finney M. Design of regular landscape fuel treatment patterns for modifying fire growth and behavior. Forest Science. Finney, M. Seli, C. McHugh, A. Ager, B Bahro, and J. Franklin A.

Anderson, R. Gutierrez, and K. Climate, habitat quality, and fitness in northern spotted owl populations in northwestern California. Ecological Monographs. Hessburg, P. Agee, and J. Dry forest and wildland fires of the inland Northwest USA: contrasting the landscape ecology of the pre-settlement and modern era.

Forest Ecology and Management. Nonaka, E. Spies, M. Wimberly, and J. Historical range of variability in live and dead wood biomass: a regional-scale simulation study. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. Historical range of variability in landscape structure: a simulation study in Oregon, USA. Ecological Applications. Powell, D. Potential vegetation, disturbance, plant succession, and other aspects of forest ecology. Pendleton, OR: U.

Turner M. Gardner, and R. Springer, New York. Wimberly, M. Spies, Long, C. Conservation Biology. Jump to Navigation. Core Habitat — an area of critical habitat for a species Hierarchy - System of interconnections or organization wherein the higher levels constrain and control the lower levels Temporal scale - Time dimension of a process or condition, characterized by fast and slow processes and may include time lags, where effects are not evident until a later time.

Cover type — Category within a classification scheme defined by the user that distinguishes among the different habitats, ecosystems or vegetation types on a landscape Landscape — A large spatial area that is heterogeneous in at least one factor of interest Source—sink dynamics - is a theoretical model used by ecologists to describe how variation in habitat quality may affect the population growth or decline of organisms.

In this model, organisms occupy two patches of habitat. One patch, the source , is a high quality habitat that on average allows the population to increase. The second patch, the sink , is very low quality habitat that, on its own, would not be able to support a population. Disturbance Regime — Describes the spatial disturbance pattern, frequency and intensity of disturbances, and resulting landscape pattern over space and time Landscape inertia —the temporal lag, delay or amount of time required for characteristics of landscapes to change in response to change in rate of disturbance or succession or some other process.

Succession — the process of change in species structure and composition of an ecological community over time. Edge — Portion of an ecosystem or cover type near its perimeter and within which environmental conditions may differ from interior locations in the ecosystem; also used as measure of the length of adjacency between cover types on a landscape Matrix — General characteristic cover of the landscape, typically distinguished by its extensive area and high connectivity.

College of Forestry, Oregon State University. Landscape ecology — is the study of landscape structure composition and pattern , processes that change landscapes disturbance, succession, management , and the function of landscapes wood, water, wildlife carbon storage. Extent - Size of the study area of the duration of time under consideration.

Mosaic - the pattern of patches , corridors , and matrix that form a landscape in its entirety. Configuration — Specific arrangement of spatial elements; often used synonymously with spatial structure or patch structure.

Patch — A place that differs in characteristics or appearance from its surroundings. Connectivity — Spatial continuity of a habitat or a cover type across a landscape.

Fragmentation — Breaking up of a habitat or cover type into smaller, disconnected parcels. Pattern is the spatial characteristics and distribution of landscape elements. Corridor — Relatively narrow strip of a particular type that differs from the areas adjacent on both sides. Heterogeneity — Quality or state of consisting of dissimilar elements, as with mixed habitats or cover types occurring on a landscape; opposite of homogeneity , in which elements are the same.

Spatial scale - Spatial dimension of an object or process, characterized by extent and grain or the size of the smallest patches of the object or process. Core Habitat — an area of critical habitat for a species. Hierarchy - System of interconnections or organization wherein the higher levels constrain and control the lower levels.

Temporal scale - Time dimension of a process or condition, characterized by fast and slow processes and may include time lags, where effects are not evident until a later time. Cover type — Category within a classification scheme defined by the user that distinguishes among the different habitats, ecosystems or vegetation types on a landscape. Landscape — A large spatial area that is heterogeneous in at least one factor of interest.

Source—sink dynamics - is a theoretical model used by ecologists to describe how variation in habitat quality may affect the population growth or decline of organisms. Disturbance Regime — Describes the spatial disturbance pattern, frequency and intensity of disturbances, and resulting landscape pattern over space and time. Landscape inertia —the temporal lag, delay or amount of time required for characteristics of landscapes to change in response to change in rate of disturbance or succession or some other process.

Edge — Portion of an ecosystem or cover type near its perimeter and within which environmental conditions may differ from interior locations in the ecosystem; also used as measure of the length of adjacency between cover types on a landscape.

Matrix — General characteristic cover of the landscape, typically distinguished by its extensive area and high connectivity. May not be present in all landscapes.


Landscape Design

Students learn design supported through emerging and current industry-based computer technologies in order to visualize, communicate and present designs using CADD, 3D modeling, visualization, illustration and digital photography techniques. Our program combines coursework with co-op work terms so students gain real-world work experiences. Students discover first-hand the links between coursework and the profession of landscape design, bringing what was learned in each work term back to the classroom to continue building key employability skills. Program field trips include botanical gardens, residential sites, Landscape Ontario designer conferences and trade shows.

This page provides a glossary of plant morphology. www. city dwellers, landscapers and designers in Free online Dictionary including thesaurus.

Lawn & Garden

Landscape design is the art of developing a property for its greatest use and enjoyment. Effective landscape design is also a science because it involves understanding the environment around your home and selecting plants that perform well in that environment. In either case, a well-conceived landscape design, properly installed and well maintained, adds value to your property and enhances the quality of your life. There are four ways in which the landscape is valuable: aesthetically, economically, functionally, and environmentally. An attractive landscape is aesthetically valuable because it adds beauty or is pleasing to your senses. The visual beauty of your home and property can be enhanced through creative landscaping while undesirable features can be downplayed. The sounds that a landscape offers, like a breeze rustling the leaves in the trees or the sounds of birds or of water splashing in a fountain, enhance the aesthetic qualities of your home environment. The aroma of flowers or the smell of a freshly mowed lawn and even the taste of fruit from plants that you might have in the landscape are soothing.

8 Basic Principles of Landscape Design

One method of describing landscapes divides a landscape into three basic elements: patches, corridors or buffers, and matrix fig. Patch: A relatively small area that has distinctly different structure and function than the surrounding landscape. Corridor or Buffer: A linear patch typically having certain enhanced functions due to its linear shape see box on next page. In developed landscapes, patches are often remnant areas of woodland or prairie, corridors are linear elements such as windbreaks, fencerows, and riparian areas, and the matrix is often developed lands such as cropland or urban areas. While this guide focuses on designing buffers, the patches and matrix areas must be considered in the design process to help achieve many desired objectives.

The first edition of the Dictionary of Architecture received excellent reviews.

Navigation

Abstract Abstract: The present paper approaches problems of exploring the availability of terminology resources for landscape architecture, strategies of improving access to these resources and possibilities of evaluating them. Mainly English resources are envisaged, with focus on Internet resources. Abstract: The present paper approaches problems of exploring the availability of terminology resources for landscape architecture, strategies of improving access to these resources and possibilities of evaluating them. Huseyin Uzunboylu Keywords: landscape architecture, terminological resources, evaluation, validation, quality, awareness. In order to analyze and validate terminological resources available in the field of landscape architecture it is necessary, first of all, to deal with the state-of-the-art. Our starting point refers to the field of landscape architecture itself.

Landscaping Terminology

Adaptable as a Houseplant - This means the plant can be grown indoors at least through the winter, but likely all year. Annual - A plant that grows, flowers, produces seed all in one season, and then does not survive the winter. It must be planted each year. Many plants we call annual may be perennial in warmer locations. When ready for sale they are dug, wrapped in burlap and then sold. Some plants may be placed in wire baskets in addition to being wrapped in burlap. Bare Root - These are plants, usually trees and shrubs, that are sold with little to no soil around the roots. Some perennials are also sold as bare root plants.

A beginners guide to gardening and landscape design from garden designer Angel Collins, who takes us through everything you need to know.

200 Essential Landscaping Vocabulary Words

We care about your experience of the process. A remodel can feel overwhelming. I have had the privilege of working with Gary on two occasions. Most recently, Gary created a paradise out of nothing but dirt and a big slope in our backyard following the construction of our new home.

RELATED VIDEO: Landscape Design - Site Planning - Part 1

Davis, Raymond J. Northwest Forest Plan—the first 20 years : status and trends of late-successional and old-growth forests. Portland, OR: U. Delcourt, H.

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We are currently in Beta version and updating this search on a regular basis. Just like the architectural elements that make up built space - floor, walls and ceilings - natural elements are also capable of creating spaces in large-, medium- and small-scale areas, in places like public and residential gardens. According to Brazilian landscape architect Benedito Abbud, " Landscaping is the only artistic expression in which the five senses of the human being participate. While architecture, painting, sculpture and other visual arts use and abuse only the vision, landscaping also involves smell, hearing, taste and touch, providing a rich sensory experience by adding the most diverse and complete perceptual experiences. The more a garden can sharpen all the senses, the better it fulfills its role.

Search for the name, locality, period or a feature of a locality. You'll then be taken to a map showing results. An enclosed exercise yard next to an asylum building.